20121 West State Hwy 52
Kinston,     AL 36453
334-378-9882
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This site last updated 12/23/2016

Acorn Scent

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Acorn - Corn Field Test #1 by Cody Weiser
August 22, 2006

Fred (Hunter Claus) sent me some of his new Corn and Acorn liquid scent attractant to try out and field test in my European boar pens. Here are my tests conducted during field test #1 and the results observed.

I make no money or profit whatsoever from these products.

I first arrived at the pens at around 6:30 pm. It was cloudy and in the low 90's. The hogs were hungry and ready to be fed. I poured a small amount of the acorn scent in one trough and the same amount of the corn scent in a trough close by. The hogs sniffed on both scents but really got after the acorn scent. Small shoats and a sow flipped over in the trough with the acorn scent.

I then fed the hogs their regular feed. I walked approx 10' away from the troughs to the water hole. I poured half the corn scent (bout 2 oz) on one side of the water hole in the mud at the water's edge. I walked to the other side of the water hole (water hole is bout 8' in diameter) and poured the acorn scent on the edge of the mud in the same manner as I did the corn. Samson (big boar in my avatar) left the feed trough after only taking a few bites (rare) and went directly to the acorn scent and rolled in it over and over covering both his sides with the acorn scent and totally wallering out a dent in the ground. (I've only seen him do this with spoiled cooking oil and Black Gold.) He did this for about 1 minute then slowly returned to the feed trough only after covering himself with the scent.

Smaller hogs walked to both areas and smelt the groung while smaller boars rolled in the acorn scent much like Samson had done.

I am totally convinced that the acorn scent was an excellent attractant for the hogs. The corn was not their pick when both scents were put out at the same time.

I will try each scent seperately in the pens on different days and then will try them in font of the game camera down by the river to see how the deer react.

_________________
Cody Weiser
Wild Boar USA-Brutal Boar Creations/ Owner
Weiser Weight & Tusk Wild Boar Record Book
Wild Boar USA


Acorn Field Test #1 by Tim Hicks
August 29, 2006

Ok I set a test up to conduct on the new scents that arrived last week. Lauren and I moved a trap where a few hot spots been occuring.

I used the Acorn Scent alone no corn as its been so hot, I have been baiting the tank WATCH-OUT with corn,,this time I used the Acorn Scent on a few rubs where they have been rubbing my Black Gold, the rest went into the trap with a dripper.

TRAP SET 2 days.

Results





Is it good??


Acorn Field Test #1 by Douglas Mason
September 2, 2006

Set this trap two days ago with Black Gold and Acron scent only.



Coons are a problem but scent seems to work.

Douglas Mason
http://txmasoncatahoulas.texasboars.com/

Cowboys for Christ
www.tdha.org

HHTA & NALC



Scott Wright of Williamson, GA
October 29, 2006

My two boys and their cousin with one of the pigs they caught in the trap using the Acorn and Grim Reaper scents.



We decided to harvest a few for the freezer on this trip. This has truely been exciting for me and my boys. We have never done any trapping, or hunting, pigs before now. Built a trap to try and catch some for a fella and we aint been deer hunting this year! Something new is always more fun.



I have had this trap set for about two months now. Caught one boar right off and then nothing for over a month. The coons were either robbing us blind or setting off the trap. The hogs would come to the trap but wouldnt enter it. Started using Acorn scent in a Wickster and sprayed Grim Reaper on the trigger mechanism. We have caught 9 pigs in the last 2-3 weeks in the same trap, in the same location.



We decided to keep these and feed them to fatten them up. No corn needed for bait anymore. Just the In Heat products.





Doug Mason of Weimar, Texas
November 2006

Caught this boar today, again in the trap useing only Acorn Scent in dripper and Black Gold.





Scott Wright
Williamson, GA
December 2006

I know that this is a pig web site, but thought I would let you guys know that I killed 2 deer yesterday morning. I took a bottle of ACORN SCENT from In Heat Scents and soaked a 5"x5" piece of felt and hung it out 2 days ago on this oak ridge. Before I went in yesterday morning I also sprayed my climbing stand down with the scent. I had 13 deer come by my stand heading to their bedding area before 9am. I knew there were a lot of deer in this area but never that many. I am certain that the ACORN SCENT helped cover my scent and drew the deer thru this area.







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Acorns are one of the most important wildlife foods in areas where oaks occur. Creatures that make acorns an important part of their diet include birds such as jays, pigeons, some ducks and several species of woodpeckers. Small mammals that feed on acorns include mice, squirrels and several other rodents. Large mammals such as pigs, bears and deer also consume large amounts of acorns; they may constitute up to 25% of the diet of deer in the autumn. In some of the large oak forests in southwest Europe, pigs are still turned loose in oak groves in the autumn, to fill and fatten themselves on acorns. However, acorns are toxic to some other animals, such as horses.

In some human cultures, acorns once constituted a dietary staple, though they are now generally only a very minor food.

The larvae of some moths and weevils also live in young acorns, consuming the kernels as they develop.

Acorns are attractive to animals because they are large and thus efficiently consumed or cached. Acorns are also rich in nutrients. Percentages vary from species to species, but all acorns contain large amounts of protein, carbohydrates and fats, as well as the minerals calcium, phosphorus and potassium, and the vitamin niacin. Total food energy in an acorn also varies by species, but all compare well with other wild foods and with other nuts.

Acorns also contain bitter tannins, the amount varying with the species. Since tannins, which are plant polyphenols, interfere with an animal's ability to metabolize protein, creatures must adapt in different ways to utilize the nutritional value that acorns contain. Animals may preferentially select acorns that contain fewer tannins. Creatures that cache acorns, such as jays and squirrels, may wait to consume some of these acorns until sufficient groundwater has percolated through them to leach the tannins out. Other animals buffer their acorn diet with other foods. Many insects, birds and mammals metabolize tannins with fewer ill-effects than humans. Several human cultures devised acorn-leaching methods that involved tools, and that could be passed on to their children.

Species of acorn that contain large amounts of tannins are very bitter, astringent, and potentially irritating if eaten raw. This is particularly true of the acorns of red oaks. The acorns of white oaks, being much lower in tannins, are nutty in flavor, which is enhanced if the acorns are given a light roast before grinding. Tannins can be removed by boiling chopped acorns in several changes of water, until water no longer turns brown. Being rich in fat, acorn flour can spoil or get moldy easily and must be carefully stored. Acorns are also sometimes prepared as a massage oil.

Acorns, being too heavy to blow in wind, do not fall far from the tree at maturity. Because of this, oaks depend on seed dispersal agents to move the acorns beyond the canopy of the mother tree and into an environment in which they can germinate and find access to adequate water, sunlight and soil nutrients, ideally a minimum of 20-30 m from the parent tree. Many acorn predators eat unripe acorns on the tree or ripe acorns from the ground, with no reproductive benefit to the oak. However, some acorn predators also serve as seed dispersal agents. Jays and squirrels that scatter-hoard acorns in caches for future use, effectively plant acorns in a variety of locations in which it is possible for them to germinate and thrive. Although jays and squirrels retain remarkably large mental maps of cache locations and return to consume them, the odd acorn may be lost, or a jay or squirrel may die before consuming all of its stores. A small number of acorns manage to germinate and survive, producing the next generation of oaks.

Scatter-hoarding behavior depends on jays and squirrels associating with plants that provide good packets of food that are nutritionally valuable, but not too big for the dispersal agent to handle. The beak sizes of jays determine how large acorns may get before jays ignore them.

Acorns germinate on different schedules, depending on their place in the oak family. Once acorns sprout, they are less nutritious, as the seed tissue converts to the indigestible lignins that form the root.

Acorns were a traditional food of many indigenous peoples of North America, but served an especially important role in California, where the ranges of several species of oaks overlap, increasing the reliability of the resource.

Acorns, unlike many other plant foods, do not need to be eaten or processed immediately, but may be stored for long time periods. In years that oaks produced many acorns, Native Americans sometimes collected enough acorns to store for two years as insurance against poor acorn production years. After drying them in the sun to discourage mold and germination, Native American women took acorns back to their villages and cached them in hollow trees or structures on poles, to keep acorns safe from mice and squirrels. These acorns could be used as needed. Storage of acorns permitted Native American women to process acorns when convenient, particularly during winter months when other resources were scarce. Women's caloric contributions to the village increased when they stored acorns for later processing and focused on gathering or processing other resources available in the autumn.

Women shelled and pulverized those acorns that germinate in the fall before those that germinate in spring. Because of their high fat content, stored acorns can become rancid. Molds may also grow on them.

Native North Americans took an active and sophisticated role in management of acorn resources through the use of fire, which increased the production of acorns and made them easier to collect. The deliberate setting of light ground fires killed the larvae of acorn moths and acorn weevils that have the potential to infest and consume more than 95% of an oak's acorns, by burning them during their dormancy period in the soil. Fires released the nutrients bound in dead leaves and other plant debris into the soil, thus fertilizing oak trees while clearing the ground to make acorn collection faster and easier. Most North American oaks tolerate light fires, especially when consistent burning has eliminated woody fuel accumulation around their trunks. Consistent burning encouraged oak growth at the expense of other trees that are less tolerant of fire, thus keeping landscapes in a state in which oaks dominated. Since oaks produce more acorns when they are not in close competition with other oaks for sunlight, water and soil nutrients, eliminating young oaks more vulnerable to fire than old oaks created open oak savannahs with trees ideally spaced to maximize acorn production. Finally, frequent fires prevented accumulation of flammable debris, which reduced the risk of destructive canopy fires that destroyed oak trees. After a century during which North American landscapes have not been managed by indigenous peoples, disastrous fires have ravaged crowded, fuel-laden forests. Land managers have realized that they can learn much from indigenous resource management techniques, such as controlled burning, widely practiced by Native Americans to enhance such resources as acorns.




Attractants and Lures can be broken down into four main categories.

  1. Food attractants and lures which appeal to the animals hunger and include ingredients in their diet, and indicate to the animal that there is food here.

  2. Curiosity attractants and lures which are scents that appeal to an animals curiosity.

  3. Matrix attractants and lures which have scents and musk from female animals that are in heat that appeal to a specific animals nature. They tend to make the animal not so suspicious, because they think one of their own kind was in the area.

  4. Gland attractants and lures, usually made from the glands of animals, which also have the effect of making an amimal think that another of his kind is on his turf. Gland attractants and lures will also plays on the territorial nature of most furbearing animals. Most furbearing animals establish a home range which they protect from invaders. The smell of an animal that is not a member of their group will usually cause an investigation. This also works both ways, because a trespassing animal will also investigate the smell to determine what other animals are in this range and which ones to avoid.

In theory, attractants and lures will provide a smell that an animal will find attractive. This being the case, some trappers and hunters believe that an attractant or lure will have an overwhelming and mesmerizing effect on the animal, causing it to cover great distances to investigate the area of the scent location. In practice, lure is most effective when used at sets made very close to the animal's natural line of travel. An animal is much more likely to investigate a smell that is close by than one that is far off. Attractants and Lures are not a substitute for reading animal sign or knowing animal habits.

For an animal to be attracted by an attractant or lure, first it must smell the scent of the atrractant or lure. That seems like a simple statement, but this is one thing that many trappers and hunters fail to consider when making scent dispenser locations. The smell of the attractant or lure travels on air currents. If there is a steady air current or a prevailing wind, an animal traveling on the upwind side of a scent dispenser will not smell the attractant or lure.

Attract and lure quantity and scents also need to be adjusted for temperature conditions. As temperature lowers, attractants and lures give off less smell, and attractant and lure quantity should generally be increased as temperatures go down.