20121 West State Hwy 52
Kinston,     AL 36453
334-378-9882
info@inheatscents.net

This site last updated 05/11/2017

The Legend of the Bear Family
Native American Lore
Penobscot

  Home Page
  Sow In Heat Urine
  Black Gold Wild Boar Attractant
  Coyote In Heat Urine
  Wolf In Heat Urine
  Grey Fox In Heat Urine
  Red Fox In Heat Urine
  Acorn Scent
  Grim Reaper Wildlife Attractant
  Corn Scent
  Apple Scent
  Wild Grape Scent
  Earth Scent
  Persimmon Scent
  Bobcat In Heat Urine
  Lynx In Heat Urine
  Male Cougar Urine
  Cougar In Heat Urine
  Bear In Heat Urine
  Raccoon In Heat Urine
  Rabbit In Heat Urine
  Mink In Heat Urine
  Whitetail Doe In Heat Urine
  Whitetail Deer Preorbital Scent
  Whitetail Deer Tarsal Gland Scent
  Whitetail Deer Semen Scent
  Whitetail Deer Rutting Buck Urine
  Current Specials
      Pro Hog Hunters All Star Pack
      Triple Double
      More...
  Testimonials
  Hunter Claus Hog Hunt Day 1
  Hunter Claus Hog Hunt Day 2
  Pro Staff Member Tim Hicks
  Tim Hicks' 400 Pound Boar
  Tim Hicks' 500 Pound Boar
  Robby's 13 Point Texas Whitetail
  David Gladfelter's SC Hog Hunt
  Tony Alvarez's Hog Setup
  Don Heyns Bucks & Boars
  Doyle Lawrence Coyote Hunt
  Robert Cobbs Call Shy Coyote
  Organizations
  Outfitters and Guides
  Live Animal Photo Gallery
  Native American Lore Menu
  Site Index
  Hunter Claus's
Special Seasoning Blend
  Fleming Farms Hunting Club
        2009 - 2010


This Site Best Viewed
with Internet Expolorer

With Java Enabled
The story concerning the Bear family was revealed through a descendant of the original hero of the following tale. He owned a very old powder horn bearing an incised representation of his mother, who was a Bear, seated in the bow of a canoe travelling to the hunting grounds with her husband.

Many, many generations ago, a Penobscot, his wife, and their little son started out from their village to go to Canada. They were from Penobscot Bay, bound for a great council and dance to be held at the Iroquois village of Caughnawaga. They went upriver to the point where they had to make a 20-mile portage to reach another river that would take them to the St. Lawrence.

The man started ahead with the canoe on his back, leaving his wife to pack part of the luggage to their first overnight campsite. The little boy ran alongside of her. While she was busy arranging her pack, her son ran on ahead to catch up with his father.

The man had gone so far ahead, the boy became lost. The mother assumed the boy was with his father. When she arrived at the campground, they discovered that their son was with neither of them. They began a search immediately, but they could not find him.

The parents returned home to tell their story to their tribe. All of the men turned out for a wide search party, which lasted for several months without success. In March of the next year, the Penobscots found some sharpened sticks near the river. They concluded that the boy must be alive and had been spearing fish. Footprints of bears were seen, and they thought perhaps the boy had been adopted by a bear family.

In the village, there was a lazy man who did not enter into the search, but lay around idly. Everyone asked him, "Why don't you help hunt for the boy? You seem to be good for nothing."

"Very well, I will," he replied. He went right to the bear's den and knocked with his bow on the rocks at the entrance. Inside, a great noise arose where the father, mother, baby bear, and adopted boy lived. The father-bear went to the entrance, holding out a birch-bark vessel. The lazy man shot at it and killed the bear.

The mother-bear says, "Now I will go." She took another vessel, held it out at the entrance, and also was killed. The baby bear did the same and was killed. All of the bears were laid out dead in the cave. Then the lazy man entered and saw the little boy terribly afraid and huddled in a dark corner, crying for his relatives and trying to hide.

The lazy hunter gently carried him home to the village and gave him to his parents. Everyone gave the lazy man presents: two blankets, a canoe, ammunition, and other good things. He became rich overnight.

The boy's parents, however, noticed that their son seemed to be turning into a bear. Bristles were showing on his upper back and shoulders, and his manners had changed. Finally they helped him to become a real person again, and he grew up to be a Penobscot Indian like his father. He married and had children. Forever after he and all of his descendants were called Bears.

They drew pictures of bears on pieces of birch-bark with charcoal and left them at camps wherever they went. All of their descendants seemed to do this and declare, "I am one of the Bear family."


This story and all of the other Native American Lore on this site were given to me by someone that found them on a CD at a yard sale.

I dont' know of anyway to get up with anyone about copyrights or any other thing of that type.

If there are any copyright infringements I will be glad to either take any or all of the stories off, or work out some other compromise.

The stories are so entertaining and teach such GREAT lessons/morals that I only want to share them with anyone that wants to read them.

They might help someone learn of their history, or be of some other help to them. I just want to share them.